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News archive for Faculty of Humanities

Susan Hickman et al. (2020) published an article entitled "Identifying the Implementation Conditions Associated With Positive Outcomes in a Successful Nursing Facility Demonstration Project" in the Gerontologist. They analyze their data using Coincidence Analysis.
Chr. Michelsen Institute and the University of Bergen have a long-standing agreement to strengthen development-related research in Bergen. We now invite applications for collaboration between our two institutions. Deadline 20 June, 2020.
New research project within the LINGCLIM group.
New research suggests that current models critically underestimate the uncertainties when predicting future irrigated areas. It also indicates that the latent environmental impact of irrigated agriculture could have been seriously miscalculated.
Alexander van der Haven, Associate Professor in Religious Studies, talks about placing forms of religiosity in a context that makes sense out of them.
In this blog we reflect on how the Covid-19 pandemic is affecting migrants with precarious legal status in Europe, with a particular focus on Norway, Germany and France - countries in which we have been doing long term ethnographic fieldwork in the WAIT-project.
Reflections from researchers at the WAIT project on the complexity of waiting in pandemic times.
The report provides an insight to our exciting activities taking place throughout the calendar year.
The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters has elected Professor Christopher Henshilwood as new member.
Ben Martin | Identifying Logical Evidence | Synthese
The authors of" Philosophy as Drama" show that any interpretation of these works must include the literary and narrative dimensions of each text, as much as serious the attention given to the progression of the argument in each piece.
The archaeologists who found the world's oldest man-made drawing are back in the South African fields in search of new discoveries. Follow their day-to-day blog and see what happens when they experiment with heat and fire to get a better understanding of how humans lived 100 000 years ago.
Six European researchers have received EU funding for research residencies at the University of Bergen through the Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions (MSCA) programme. Four of the six grants go to research projects in collaboration with the Faculty of Humanities.
Mark Young, who defended his PhD thesis in the department recently, has been awarded the prestigious Marie Curie Postdoctoral EU Fellowship. The primary objective of his project is: to develop a new philosophical approach to the study of automation that recognizes the essential role played by human operators.
The CALENDARS project is still in it's first phase and the first year of the project has been filled with activities. We have had several workshops and public events as well as assemblage the full CALENDAR team in both Norway and New Zealand. Below you can read Dr Paul Schneider's reflections on the first six months of the project in Coromandel, New Zealand.
Ph.d. candidate Kari Anne Drangsland have published the article "Waiting as a redemptive state: The ‘Lampedusa in Hamburg’ and the offer from the Hamburg government" in acclaimed journal Time and Society.
New research proves that our ancestors cooked starchy rhizome 170 000 years ago. The study also implies that the food was shared as a social act around the fire.
The archaeologists who found the World's oldest man-made drawing are back in Blombos Cave in search of new discoveries. Professor Henshilwood welcomes us to the cave to show us his team at work as they dig for clues that can tell us how early humans lived.

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