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News archive for Faculty of Humanities

Michael Baumgartner published an article introducing the main theories of causation to political scientists in the SAGE Handbook of Political Science.
The archaeologists who found the World's oldest man-made drawing are back in the South African fields in search of new discoveries. Follow their day-to-day blog and see what happens when they experiment with heat and fire to get a better understanding of how humans lived 100 000 years ago.
Six European researchers have received EU funding for research residencies at the University of Bergen through the Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions (MSCA) programme. Four of the six grants go to research projects in collaboration with the Faculty of Humanities.
Mark Young, who defended his PhD thesis in the department recently, has been awarded the prestigious Marie Curie Postdoctoral EU Fellowship. The primary objective of his project is: to develop a new philosophical approach to the study of automation that recognizes the essential role played by human operators.
The CALENDARS project is still in it's first phase and the first year of the project has been filled with activities. We have had several workshops and public events as well as assemblage the full CALENDAR team in both Norway and New Zealand. Below you can read Dr Paul Schneider's reflections on the first six months of the project in Coromandel, New Zealand.
Ph.d. candidate Kari Anne Drangsland have published the article "Waiting as a redemptive state: The ‘Lampedusa in Hamburg’ and the offer from the Hamburg government" in acclaimed journal Time and Society.
New research proves that our ancestors cooked starchy rhizome 170 000 years ago. The study also implies that the food was shared as a social act around the fire.
The archaeologists who found the World's oldest man-made drawing are back in Blombos Cave in search of new discoveries. Professor Henshilwood welcomes us to the cave to show us his team at work as they dig for clues that can tell us how early humans lived.
Do student teachers feel prepared to teach English in multilingual classrooms? Synne Nordlie investigated student teachers’ beliefs about multilingualism in her fresh master’s thesis.
The ERC project MACHINE VISION has received funding from the Norwegian Research Council to develop a live action role-playing game and an exhibition at the University Museum.
In Israel, as in the United States, children have become pawns in government efforts to expel migrants -- despite clear evidence that arresting, detaining, and deporting children violates their human rights and has long-term traumatic effects. Policies like these demand our swift, strong, and emphatic condemnation.
PhD candidate Thor Olav Iversen talked to the acknowledged Professor Theodore Porter about the history of numbers in science and society, governing by privatized algorithm and many other things.
New dissemination video from the MAGIC project on what happens when there is uncertainty and the science is not complete?
Last week, we ended our semester with a full-day event on approaches to research algorithms without going into the code. Experts Ysabel Gerrard and Taina Bucher each gave a lecture and, in the workshop afterwards, participants discussed their ideas and obstacles on the ways in which they research algorithms.
New digital technology makes it possible to recreate the lives led by our ancestors 100,000 years ago.
Last week, special guest Lars Johnsen gave a workshop for the DHNetwork on how to use data the National Library of Norway as a source for computational analysis. The varied groups of participants from the humanities, social sciences and university library learned to use different tools to analyze textual data in Jupyter Notebooks.
In a well-attended afternoon, Charles Ess and Eva Payne gave talks about the state of the art of research ethics followed by a closed workshop session for students and researchers using social media data in their projects.

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