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For the second consecutive year, the anthropology environment at the University of Bergen is in the QS by Subject top 100.
Birgit Kopainsky is partner in a project about sustainability and resilience in European agriculture. The project recently received more than 4.8 million Euros from the EU’s Horizon 2020 programme.
The mouth and anus are not connected in the development of the embryo as earlier thought, shows a ground-breaking study from the Sars Centre, published in Nature Ecology and Evolution.
Latin American newspapers use a technical language when describing poverty. According to researcher Ana Beatriz Chiquito, this makes it more difficult to understand the causes and effects of poverty.
Humans living in South Africa in the Middle Stone Age used advanced heating techniques that vastly improved living conditions during the era.
Andrea Bender combines psychology and anthropology to observe how our language and culture shape the way we perceive the world.
A large national Norwegian study shows that workaholism frequently co-occurs with ADHD, OCD, anxiety, and depression.
A new reconstruction of this ice sheet shows the interaction between climate and glaciers - how the ice sheet grows and retreats.
Where does the acoel flatworm belong in the tree of life? Biologists have discussed this question for the last 20 years. Now Andreas Hejnol and his colleagues at the Sars Centre believe they have found the answer. The results are published in Nature.
Humans release approximately 73 litres of intestinal gas a year and according to Professor Trygve Hausken, there is no reason to hold back a fart.
Children of mothers with diseases like asthma or arthritis have up to eighty per cent higher risk of developing ADHD.
The Marine Microbiology Group and other scientists conducted a large experiment on marine microbial ecology in Svalbard during the summer of 2015. The experiment was recently featured in 'Schrödinger's Katt' on NRK.
Climate change and opportunities for sustainable business in East Africa
Living in the city benefits the environment, says geographer Håvard Haarstad. The Ten Minute City may be the future of urban living.
A special gene variant may be part of the explanation for increased fat storage in half of the population. This finding may give patients new and better targeted treatments in the future.
Insects are the most successful group of organisms in the history of life. A discovery of new genes suggests why.
Using a new method, researchers in Bergen discovered that so-called climate sceptics are more ambivalent about climate issues than previously assumed. Their results have now been published in Nature Climate Change.
The EU-funded ECOPAS project brings together anthropology, climate research and performative arts to highlight the challenges faced by Pacific island nations.

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