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Department of Comparative Politics

News archive for Department of Comparative Politics

What are the consequences of the judicialization of controversial and moral political questions? This is the main research question of Vegard Furustøl Vibe’s PhD project.
Professors Kristin Strømsnes and Per Selle discuss 50 years of protests against the Norwegian parliament in a chapter in a new book on the parliament's recent history.
How has the internationalization of Norwegian law affected the Supreme Court's influence on Norwegian society? This is the researh question Jon Kåre Skiple addresses in his PhD studies.
Professor Per Selle argues in an op-ed in newspaper Nordlys that the Sami parliament has developed into an important actor in Norwegian politics and government. The op-ed is written together with Torvald Falch, senior advisor to the Sami parliament.
Stefan Dahlberg (University of Gothenburg) visits the Department of Comparative Politics as a guest researcher this Fall. His research areas include representative democracy, democratic legitimacy, political parties and voting behavior.
As Frank Aarebrot prepares to give four lectures on US history at Radøy near Bergen, locals are a signing up on a waiting list to hear the popular professor speak.
Post-doc Gyda Marås Sindre examines in a new article attempts to link development aid and humanitarian assistance with peace negotiations in Aceh and Sri Lanka. The main finding is that such a link may have positive effects, but also divert attention away from core conflict issues.
Constitutional reform intended to modernize the judiciary and promote judicial independence can have the opposite effect, Andrea Castagnola and Aníbal Pérez-Liñán find in a new article published in the British Journal of Political Science.
Professor Jonas Linde and Associate Professor Elisabeth Ivarsflaten of the Department of Comparative Politics provided expertise analysis for TV2 during the Swedish parliamentary election last Sunday.
Associate Professor Elisabeth Ivarsflaten says to Newspaper Aftenposten that the two parties’ different origins render them not fully comparable.
Increasing the pressure on mosques can contribute to further radicalization of Muslims, PhD student Olav Elgvin writes in an op-ed in newspaper Aftenposten.
How parties are able to reward their own voters was the topic of the 2014 Stein Rokkan Memorial Lecture. Students and faculty at the Department of Comparative Politics filled the auditorium to hear the prominent professor speak.
Associate Professor Ragnhild L. Muriaas and Happy M. Kayuni find in a new study of Malawi that even though earmarked electoral financing can improve the prospects of female candidates in intra-party nomination battles, such strategies also have unintended negative consequences.
How do Muslim religious leaders in Europe understand the relationship between Islam and politics? This will be answered in Olav Elgvin’s PhD proejct.
To grasp developments in Norwegian politics, Stein Rokkan’s perspectives are needed, PhD student Olav Elgvin of the Department of Comparative Politics writes in newspaper Klassekampen. Rokkan’s political-sociological perspectives are not sufficiently present, according to Elgvin.
The new Centre on Law & Social Transformation officially opened on 22 August and is to be a dynamo for interdisciplinary research on law as an instrument of social change.

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