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University Museum of Bergen

News archive for University Museum of Bergen

Over a short period of time at the end of the 1200s, 6-7000 animals were caught and butchered at Lake Finnsbergvann on the Hardangervidda mountain plateau. After about 50 years, the hunting came to an abrupt end. What type of hunting was this, what was the final destination of the products, who organised it and how did if affect the reindeer population?
In the days between Christmas and New Year’s Eve, the University Museum of Bergen is open every day, from Tuesday 27.12 to and included Friday 30.12. On Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, Boxing Day, New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day the Museum is closed.
Ravaging winds have left traces behind at Milde over the last few days. Spruces have been knocked down and events have had to be cancelled.
The mistletoe is an exciting evergreen parasitic scrub associated with a lot of mysticism, traditions, and medicinal uses. Well hidden by the foliage of their host plants, four young mistletoe scrubs have been left alone for at least 6 years until they were discovered after the leaf fall this autumn.
The mistletoe is an exciting evergreen parasitic scrub associated with a lot of mysticism, traditions, and medicinal uses. Well hidden by the foliage of their host plants, four young mistletoe scrubs have been left alone for at least 6 years until they were discovered after the leaf fall this autumn.
New, smart mobile phones have now become extremely relevant as knowledge sources at the University Museum of Bergen. You can now get information about the objects and the topics in an exhibition direct to your mobile phone.
The Barents Sea diversity of fish species has now been mapped in a 274-page big fish atlas: Atlas of the Barents Sea Fishes.
The recently opened online shop of the University Museum of Bergen now offers shopping bags, umbrellas, mobile phone pouches, notepads, and book markers in our two museum shops at much discounted prices!
In the final round for applications, two projects at the University Museum of Bergen were granted support from the Norwegian Biodiversity Information Centre.
Become an archaeologist for one day. Learn more about life in the Stone Age and the Viking Age. Try being a hunter and forming a phalanx like a real Viking. Next Sunday, the University Museum of Bergen hosts Archaeology Day.
This autumn, The Middle Ages are truly at the centre of attention in Bergen. Wednesday 28 September starts the first lecture in a series connected to the exhibition Fragments of the past.
Many alpine plants demand gravel and talus soils where the vegetation cover is open. It is challenging, but essential to mimic their natural habitats if we want to make pioneer plants thrive in the Alpine Garden
Minister Tora Aasland handed over 10 million NOK to new infrastructure for the areas surrounding the Museum. Among other things, a greater connection between the new Aula and the Student Centre will be created.
How closely related are molluscs like clams, mussels, and squids, all from our second largest phylum? How did their shell, nervous system, body, and head develop?
Bergen museum, The Natural History Collections has been voted Best Museum in Bergen in a competition hosted by Bergens Tidende, the major regional newspaper in Western Norway.
How did royal power and government apparatus develop in Norway in the Middle Ages? How did new legislation contribute to a state with courts of justice and judicial power?
This year, we have a display of special vegetables from Asia and Ancient Rome, and also cereal grains from Afghanistan.

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