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How can the ocean provide knowledge and research for the medicine and food of the future? The Covid-19 pandemic has shown the world community that biodiversity is key to securing solutions for the future and how dependent we are of the secrets of the ocean.
Inspired by the Covid-19 pandemic, UiB researchers present five principles for model quality.
In response to the Covid-19 pandemic, the research programme GRIP launched a series of interviews on global inequality in March 2020. With more than 20 interviews out, GRIP is now looking at how to bring the debate on inequality into the mainstream.
– Covid-19 has shown that we need a new debate about decision-making in crises when the scientific answers are not yet available. Numbers and calculations are insufficient when it comes to handling the worldwide crisis that the pandemic has triggered, says Professor Jeroen Van der Sluijs.
Postdoctoral Fellow Joanna Siekiera reports on a new summer school educating the science diplomats of the future, with participation from around the world.
The University Gardens have received official accreditation from Botanic Gardens Conservation International as conforming to the highest international standards.
Do you know where the personal data you leave behind in apps and on social media is used? A new method for analyzing data developed by Professor Jill Walker Rettberg helps identify precisely that.
In the near future deaf people and hearing people may be able to communicate in real time, using automatic translation systems based on computer vision technologies. Now researchers are carefully studying facial expressions used in sign language to express both grammatical information and emotions.
Biodiversity is one of the key issues in the debate for sustaining and developing our common ocean resources. Law researchers at the University of Bergen have long been engaged in judicial questions outside national marine territories.
Even only few hours with cognitive behavioural therapy has very good effect on persons with hypochondria 10 years after treatment.
Ocean science is at the core of the University of Bergen’s science diplomacy activities. By juxtaposing the 17 goals of the 2030 Agenda, the university and its partners are quietly providing policymakers with research-based knowledge for global sustainability.
During the Spring of 2020, the University of Bergen had to close access to campus for employees and students to hinder spreading of the corona virus, and all teaching and assessment were shifted to digital platforms.
“The ocean has enormous potential. It's not only that we can, but also because we have to produce more from the ocean if we are to avoid climate change,” said Vidar Helgesen aboard tall ship Statsraad Lehmkuhl on World Ocean Day.
The University of Bergen’s interdisciplinary SDG14 course educates the future ocean science leaders to engage critically with the 2030 Agenda.
Reporting on ocean acidification data directly targeting the Sustainable Development Goals is all in a day’s work for Benjamin Pfeil and his data group at the University of Bergen.
In October 2018 the University of Bergen was given a lead role on SDG14, Life below water, by United Nations Academic Impact. Now the university has been asked to present a four-part series for inspiration on ocean research and education. The UN distributes the series globally.
How do climate and land-use changes influence fish catch in lakes? That has been at the centre of a major international study which urges policymakers to increase funding for land and water management to create a more sustainable fisheries industry.
The student choir “Arme Riddere”, Rector Dag Rune Olsen, as well as students and employees from UiB's many home offices congratulates everyone on the Constitution Day of Norway. See the video here.

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