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News archive for Department of Earth Science

When the last ice age was over, a large glacier covering the 1000 meter deep Hardangerfjord collapsed. These events at the end of the ice age in Norway, resemble what we are about to witness in today’s Greenland.
Widespread sea ice decline happened within 250 years or less and unleashed abrupt climate change during the last glacial period, a new study shows. This documents that the cause for the rapidity and severity of abrupt changes during the last glacial resides in the ocean. Henrik Sadatzki writes about the work he has been leading.
Modeling and inversion of seismic data using multiple scattering, renormalization and homotopy methods.
Temperature in the Southern Ocean was more tightly linked to the extent of Antarctic glaciation during past greenhouse climates than previously thought.
The effects of magmatic intrusions on temperature history and diagenesis in sedimentary basins and petroleum systems.
The Jebsen Centre has a new PhD candidate starting today!
Near the end of the last ice age, the global sea level rose 12–14 meters in less than 350 years. Most of the meltwater has been thought to have come from North America and Antarctica. A new study shows that the ice over coastal Norway and the Barents Sea may have contributed almost as much.
Last month Andreas Beinlich had a publication in Nature Geoscience, and this month we are happy to announce that a new publication from Jebsen Centre researchers is out in Nature Geoscience: Today Jo Brendryen, Bjarte Hannisdal, and Kristian Agasøster Haaga published “Eurasian Ice Sheet collapse was a major source of Meltwater Pulse 1A 14,600 years ago”.
Andreas Beinlich, the latest addition to the K.G. Jebsen Centre for Deep Sea Research, has published an article in Nature Geoscience, titled "Instantaneous rock transformations in the deep crust driven by reactive fluid flow".
Want to learn about how methane and organic compounds form in Earth's lithosphere? Look no further!
MSc. Jonathan Winfieldd Rheinlænder ved Institutt for geovitenskap og Bjerknessenteret for klimaforskning disputerte fredag 17. januar med avhandlingen: "The role of ocean circulation and sea ice in abrupt climate change"
iEarth becomes one of the Norwegian Centres of Excellence in Education. The University of Bergen now hosts two of the prestigious centres that focus on innovative and forward-looking education.
During the coldest years of the last ice-age the ice cap reached the British Isles and Polen. New research has revealed that an ice-free green spot existed further north - on a penisula close to Spitsbergen.
MSc. Silje Smith-Johnsen ved Institutt for geovitenskap og Bjerknessenteret for klimaforskning disputerte i dag med avhandlingen «Dynamics of the Northeast Greenland Ice Stream: the role of geothermal heat and subglacial hydrology».
An international and multidisciplinary team of 36 scientists and engineers, with the assistance of the officers and crew of the vessel, conducted a multidisciplinary investigation of deep (4000 m) hydrothermal vents under permanent ice cover in the Arctic.
The world’s sea level was at one time ten meters higher than today. Researchers have now discovered where the water came from. 

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