Home
Department of Earth Science

News archive for Department of Earth Science

Old volcano at the Vøring Plateau was named Eldhø. The name was chosen to honor the extensive pioneer research that Professor Emeritus Olav Eldholm has carried out on volcanism and plate tectonics in this part of the Norwegian Sea since the 1960s.
Runar Stokke, researcher at the Center for Deep Sea Research, is now leading an international project that will aim at investigating the genetic diversity of microbial communities in the hydrothermal systems of the Arctic Mid-Ocean ridge.
The geomicrobiology laboratory starts the "My green lab" certification.
As every year when summer starts, the Center for Deep Sea Research sets sails on the G.O SARS to investigate and sample the Nordic Seas.
Geophysical characterization of a shallow hydrothermal system by an international team of researchers.
Headlines for a researcher at the Center after EGU presentation
When we look at the sky and think "Are we alone?", there is no need to look only for planets receiving sun light.
A new project for the Center for Deep Sea Research financed by the Norwegian Research Council.
A new study from researchers from the Center for Deep Sea Research tells about a 80 000 year long powernap on the seafloor.
Two PhD students from the Center for Deep Sea Research have written an article for Aftenposten on the search for the origins of life.
Kikki Kleiven follows Tore Furevik as the direcor of Bjernes Centre, and will lead 200 climate researchers the coming four years.
Alma Dzozlic Bradaric completed her master's degree at GEO in 2020. Now she has received the first prize: Earth Model Award Winner from Halliburton for her brilliantly executed master's project.
The effect of increased mantle temperature at wide volcanic margins is likely overestimated. Large volumes of magmatism at volcanic rifted margin can be explained by depth-dependent extension and very moderate excess mantle potential temperature.
Mighty floods have carved out deep canyons on Earth. New research suggests this may have required less power than previously thought. Collecting such data, however, may be demanding.
The UN Ocean Science Decade gets off to a flying start through the University of Bergen’s new interdisciplinary SEAS Fellowship Programme. For the next 5 years, UiB will be training a new generation of marine research leaders and decision makers to ensure sustainable oceans.
Invitation to the EPOS-Norway (EPOS-N) Final Workshop sharing the outcomes and achievements of the EPOS-N project in the areas of Solid Earth data integration and e-infrastructure, and Solid Earth monitoring in the Artic.
When the last ice age was over, a large glacier covering the 1000 meter deep Hardangerfjord collapsed. These events at the end of the ice age in Norway, resemble what we are about to witness in today’s Greenland.

Pages