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News archive for Department of Earth Science

A competence building project coordinated by the University of Bergen will investigate if deep-sea mining on the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge can take place sustainably, avoiding serious harm to the environment. The project will run for three years with a total budget of approximately 18 million NOK, where more than 13 million are granted by the Research Council of Norway.
Members of the Center have been onboard the Kronprins Håkon for an expedition to the Aurora vent field under the arctic ice.
An interdisciplinary team from the University of Bergen, has taken a major step forward in deep sea exploration and sampling of Earth’s last truly remote and inaccessible seafloor environment – the extreme depths of the ice-covered Arctic Ocean. 
Old volcano at the Vøring Plateau was named Eldhø. The name was chosen to honor the extensive pioneer research that Professor Emeritus Olav Eldholm has carried out on volcanism and plate tectonics in this part of the Norwegian Sea since the 1960s.
Runar Stokke, researcher at the Center for Deep Sea Research, is now leading an international project that will aim at investigating the genetic diversity of microbial communities in the hydrothermal systems of the Arctic Mid-Ocean ridge.
The geomicrobiology laboratory starts the "My green lab" certification.
As every year when summer starts, the Center for Deep Sea Research sets sails on the G.O SARS to investigate and sample the Nordic Seas.
Geophysical characterization of a shallow hydrothermal system by an international team of researchers.
Headlines for a researcher at the Center after EGU presentation
When we look at the sky and think "Are we alone?", there is no need to look only for planets receiving sun light.
A new project for the Center for Deep Sea Research financed by the Norwegian Research Council.
A new study from researchers from the Center for Deep Sea Research tells about a 80 000 year long powernap on the seafloor.
Two PhD students from the Center for Deep Sea Research have written an article for Aftenposten on the search for the origins of life.
Kikki Kleiven follows Tore Furevik as the direcor of Bjernes Centre, and will lead 200 climate researchers the coming four years.
Alma Dzozlic Bradaric completed her master's degree at GEO in 2020. Now she has received the first prize: Earth Model Award Winner from Halliburton for her brilliantly executed master's project.
The effect of increased mantle temperature at wide volcanic margins is likely overestimated. Large volumes of magmatism at volcanic rifted margin can be explained by depth-dependent extension and very moderate excess mantle potential temperature.
Mighty floods have carved out deep canyons on Earth. New research suggests this may have required less power than previously thought. Collecting such data, however, may be demanding.

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