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News archive for Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

In the mid-latitudes the weather changes quickly. Changing winds influence the heat exchange between the atmosphere and the ocean. A new study by Fumiaki Ogawa and Thomas Spengler shows how important it is to consider short-term phenomena like extratropical cyclones and cold air outbreaks when calculating air-sea fluxes. Read their account below.
In a number of European countries, there is a clear imbalance between long-term disaster risk reduction and short-term preparation, according to a new study. With increasing amounts of data, there is a potential for investments in long-term reduction measures, but data availability is not enough. Jenny Sjåstad Hagen, co-author of the study, writes about the importance of data interoperability.
Lauritzen is recognized for seminal and ongoing contributions to the field of speleothem science
For two intense weeks,students and lecturers from around the world gathered in the small town of Yosemite National Park to discuss climate science as part of the ACDC summer school
The national conference GEOFAREDAGEN ("GEO HAZARDS DAY") gathers the current and future geoscientists; Students, educators and people working on risks associated with natural and geological processes.
Had it not been for the Trond Mohn Foundation, Bodil Holst would have worked as a patent consultant in Munich. Thanks to a recruitment grant in 2007, however, she is now one of the most innovative researchers at the University of Bergen.
Erik Kolstad and Scott Bremer organise training in transdisciplinary climate adaptation research for early career researchers.
How can your research contribute to solving global challenges? How do you design, conduct and communicate research to stimulate social change? And how do you create actionable knowledge?
Erik Kusch won second prize in two categories for the poster he presented at the International Society for Ecological Modelling conference in Salzburg in October 2019
What are our safe operating spaces for the ocean? This is the starting question for the new EU Horizon 2020 project COMFORT.
Prof. Anne Canteaut is the scientific leader of the project-team SECRET at INRIA (National Institute for Research in Computer Science and Automation), and the chair of the Inria Evaluation Committee. She becomes one of the ten honorary doctors at the University of Bergen in 2019.
More effective as well as cheaper technology will be the outcome of a new innovation project, led by the University of Bergen.
Our guest student from Italy has made this video from the OBS Cruise last summer
The location of the jet stream influences European weather at all times. A new study links its position both to local weather systems and to the far-away Pacific Ocean. Lead author Erica Madonna explains.